Qiologician

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Discovering What It Means to be a Doctor • Poney Chiang

Discovering What It Means to be a Doctor • Poney Chiang

In our last conversation with Poney, we talked about the neurological view of acupuncture points. In this Part Two conversation we’re exploring what got Poney interested in medicine in the first place and how he ended up becoming an acupuncturist when his first interest was in herbs, philosophy and metaphysics.

In this conversation we talk about the deep structure of Chinese medicine, kung fu movies, the Yi Jing, feng shui and how life takes unexpected turns. Poney also shares how Chinese medicine allowed him to grow as a person and how it helped him do things he never thought would be doing.

by Feb 2, 2020
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Using Saam in the Community Clinic • Toby Daly

This is the audio of a webinar conversation on the use of Saam acupuncture in the community clinic setting.
We get into particular benefits of the Saam system and why it’s well suited to using in the community clinic setting. And detail some challenges and considerations in terms of training that need to be addressed.

Finally, we talk about a few commonly seen issues in the community clinic and how to treat them.

by Jan 27, 2020
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Practical Cosmology • Deborah Woolf

Practical Cosmology • Deborah Woolf

How does acupuncture work?

We hear this question all the time. From our patients, from someone we just met at a neighborhood BBQ, from out parents, and if we are honest— ourselves.
The ancient Chinese mind that conjured up acupuncture did not consider nerve pathways, endocrinological response or brain chemistry.

The ancient Chinese mind looked out into nature and used that reflection to dream into the body. They considered the natural tides of expansion and contraction. The formed and the unformed, and how physical form arises from an unseen patterning that leaves its trace, like wind on deserts sands.

by Dec 25, 2019
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Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

Five Movements and Six Qi • Sharon Weizenbaum

We often consider the Five Phases when doing acupuncture, and the Six Conformations when treating our patients with herbal medicine.

In this conversation we consider the interplay of “wu yun, liu qi” the five movements and six climatic qi from the perspective of diagnosis and understanding not just what problem a patient has, but also its progression through time.

by Sep 1, 2019
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Slow Medicine: How Chinese Medicine Became Associated With the Treatment of Chronic Illness • Eric Karchmer

Slow Medicine: How Chinese Medicine Became Associated With the Treatment of Chronic Illness • Eric Karchmer

When I lived in China I’d often hear people there say “use western medicine for quick results, but use Chinese medicine for chronic conditions.” It was a bit confusing for me, as even as a student and new practitioner I’d see Chinese medicine be really helpful for more acute conditions. It made me wonder if the Chinese really understood Chinese medicine.

In this conversation we get some perspective on this issue. Listen into this discussion on how the clashing of cultures and China’s desire to “modernize” had an impact on the medicine we practice.

by Aug 18, 2019
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Moving Through Trauma: A Path of Healing and Resiliency • Alaine Duncan

Moving Through Trauma: A Path of Healing and Resiliency • Alaine Duncan

Trauma has both a physiological and emotional impact on us. It can set up a kind of dysregulation that while in the midst of trauma can be adaptive, and in fact help us to survive, but over time can be source of all kinds of physical and emotional problems. 

In this “part two” conversation we discuss the cycle of healing that can occur as patients move through the five phases of trauma and recovery. And how Chinese medicine, an understanding of modern neurobiology, and gentle hands on work can not only heal trauma, but help to build greater resiliency.  

by Aug 4, 2019
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Exploring the Landscape of the Pulse • Peter Eckman

Exploring the Landscape of the Pulse • Peter Eckman

The pulse is emblematic of Chinese medicine. It is a highly subjective measure that helps us to orient in helpful ways toward a patient’s problem and their strengths.

While most any practitioner would tell you the pulse is vitally important in accessing a patient’s condition, the ways in which we can approach and interact with the pulse are wide and varied.

In this conversation we explore the pulse and how we as practitioners can use it as an exploration not just of the patient, but of our own process as well.

by May 1, 2019